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propaganda [2014/10/15 12:22]
mckean
propaganda [2015/01/12 08:43] (current)
oosterloo [Posters]
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 ^ Title ^ Author ^ Description (suitable for AJDI) ^ Link + Thumbnail ^ AJDI \\ Subm. ^ ^ Title ^ Author ^ Description (suitable for AJDI) ^ Link + Thumbnail ^ AJDI \\ Subm. ^
 |M101 | Tom Oosterloo| Neutral hydrogen in the spiral galaxy M101, observed with the WSRT.| PDF: {{:​propaganda:​appp2014:​m101poster.pdf|}} {{ :​propaganda:​appp2014:​m101poster.png?​150 }}  RAW: {{KeynoteFile}} | Y | |M101 | Tom Oosterloo| Neutral hydrogen in the spiral galaxy M101, observed with the WSRT.| PDF: {{:​propaganda:​appp2014:​m101poster.pdf|}} {{ :​propaganda:​appp2014:​m101poster.png?​150 }}  RAW: {{KeynoteFile}} | Y |
 +|M101 | Tom Oosterloo| Neutral hydrogen in the spiral galaxy M101, observed with the WSRT.| PDF: {{:​propaganda:​appp2014:​m101-2.jpg.pdf|}} {{ :​propaganda:​appp2014:​m101-2_copy.png?​150 }}  RAW: {{KeynoteFile}} | Y |
 | Global VLBI imaging of the gravitational lens MG J0751+2716 | John McKean |Gravitational lensing is the deflection of light from a distant background object (the source) by an intervening mass distribution (the lens). If the surface mass density of the lens is sufficiently high, then multiple images of the background source, which are often highly magnified and distorted, are produced. The gravitational lensing phenomena is beautifully illustrated in this global very long baseline interferometry image of MG J0751+2716 at redshift 3.2. Here, the extended background radio source is highly distorted into several images, some of which are stretched to form large gravitational arcs. Never before has such high angular resolution of extended arcs been seen before, which highlights the excellent sensitivity that can be achieved with VLBI arrays today (a collecting area that is about 10 per cent of the SKA). | {{:​propaganda:​appp2014:​mckean_poster1_new.pdf|}} {{ :​propaganda:​appp2014:​mckean_poster1_new.png?​150 }} RAW: {{:​propaganda:​appp2014:​mckean_poster1.key.tar}} |  | | Global VLBI imaging of the gravitational lens MG J0751+2716 | John McKean |Gravitational lensing is the deflection of light from a distant background object (the source) by an intervening mass distribution (the lens). If the surface mass density of the lens is sufficiently high, then multiple images of the background source, which are often highly magnified and distorted, are produced. The gravitational lensing phenomena is beautifully illustrated in this global very long baseline interferometry image of MG J0751+2716 at redshift 3.2. Here, the extended background radio source is highly distorted into several images, some of which are stretched to form large gravitational arcs. Never before has such high angular resolution of extended arcs been seen before, which highlights the excellent sensitivity that can be achieved with VLBI arrays today (a collecting area that is about 10 per cent of the SKA). | {{:​propaganda:​appp2014:​mckean_poster1_new.pdf|}} {{ :​propaganda:​appp2014:​mckean_poster1_new.png?​150 }} RAW: {{:​propaganda:​appp2014:​mckean_poster1.key.tar}} |  |
 | PSR B0823+26: Emission modes in single pulses | Charlotte Sobey |PSR B0823+26 displays a plethora of magnetospheric emission characteristics over a wide range of timescales. ​ Single-pulse data from the LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) telescope aided in the detection of a sporadic and weakly-emitting '​quiet’ mode over hour-long periods, which displays rotating radio transient-like features with a nulling fraction forty-times greater than that during the more regularly-emitting '​bright’ mode. Furthermore,​ the transition from the newly-discovered '​quiet’ mode to the '​bright’ mode occurs within one rotational period of the pulsar (0.5 s) and is concurrent across a broad range of radio frequencies. ​ Studying such pulsars furthers insight into the relationship between the host of magnetospheric radio emission characteristics and understanding of the physical mechanism behind this.  (c) C. Sobey; no connection with Joy Division, Peter Saville, et al.  | {{propaganda:​appp2014:​poster_sobey.pdf}} ​ {{ propaganda:​appp2014:​poster_sobey.png?​150 }} | Y | | PSR B0823+26: Emission modes in single pulses | Charlotte Sobey |PSR B0823+26 displays a plethora of magnetospheric emission characteristics over a wide range of timescales. ​ Single-pulse data from the LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) telescope aided in the detection of a sporadic and weakly-emitting '​quiet’ mode over hour-long periods, which displays rotating radio transient-like features with a nulling fraction forty-times greater than that during the more regularly-emitting '​bright’ mode. Furthermore,​ the transition from the newly-discovered '​quiet’ mode to the '​bright’ mode occurs within one rotational period of the pulsar (0.5 s) and is concurrent across a broad range of radio frequencies. ​ Studying such pulsars furthers insight into the relationship between the host of magnetospheric radio emission characteristics and understanding of the physical mechanism behind this.  (c) C. Sobey; no connection with Joy Division, Peter Saville, et al.  | {{propaganda:​appp2014:​poster_sobey.pdf}} ​ {{ propaganda:​appp2014:​poster_sobey.png?​150 }} | Y |
propaganda.txt · Last modified: 2015/01/12 08:43 by oosterloo