ASTRON reveals life cycle of supermassive black hole

For the first time LOFAR and WSRT-Apertif have been used together to measure the life cycle of supermassive black holes emitting radio waves.

Cosmic flashes come in all different sizes

On May 24, four European telescopes took part in the global effort to understand mysterious cosmic flashes. The telescopes captured flashes of radio waves from an extreme, magnetised star in our galaxy.

Data release from the first year of the Apertif imaging surveys

The Apertif imaging team has released science data from the first year of science operations of WSRT-Apertif as the Apertif Data Release 1 (DR1). Now the entire astronomical community can access the data collected by Apertif in its first year of observing, which started on 1 July 2019.

First direct detection of a brown dwarf with a radio telescope

Astronomers at ASTRON  have discovered a brown dwarf with LOFAR. The discovery of the object dubbed Elegast, opens up a new path that uses radio telescopes to discover faint objects that are close-cousins of Jupiter-like exoplanets.

Latest tweets

Congratulations to our former colleague and LOFAR scientist Heino Falcke with his prize! 🥳

How does a radio wave become a picture? Part II: Compact receivers. A radio wave that has travelled light years is picked up by a receiver on a telescope through an antenna. The (very weak) signal is then amplified and digitized. Read part 2 here: http://bit.ly/3aznntV

How does a radio wave become a picture? Planets, stars and nebula’s all emit radio waves, which are a form of invisible light waves. Read here the first part on what happens to those radio waves when they are received by a radio telescope! 📡🌠http://bit.ly/2YFDuQM

What's it like to work at ASTRON?
Project manager @PieterBenthem tells about his job, among which his work on the AAVS1 for the @SKA_telescope, of which LOFAR is a pathfinder project.
https://bit.ly/3bMKIv8

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