Telescopes

ASTRON is responsible for the operations of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR).

Astronomy

The astronomical research at ASTRON is closely aligned with the strengths of our facilities LOFAR and WSRT-APERTIF.

Research and Innovation


Radio astronomy delivers important breakthrough technology for our society.

News & Events


Read all our latest news here.

Making discoveries
in radio astronomy
happen.

ASTRON is the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, and is part of the Institutes organisation of NWO.
STORIES
Famous fast radio burst FRB20180916B just barely lets itself be captured

Two international teams of astronomers (with significant Dutch involvement) have published two scientific papers with new information about the famous fast radio burst FRB20180916B.

Ultra-sensitive radio images reveal thousands of star-forming galaxies in early Universe

An international team of astronomers has published the most sensitive images of the Universe ever taken at low radio frequencies, using the International Low Frequency Array (LOFAR).

Europe’s radio and optical astronomy communities team up in new EC-funded project

A new project has kicked off to enhance cooperation between European astronomy facilities and promote transnational access among them. ASTRON (Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy), ILT (International LOFAR Telescope), JIV-ERIC (Joint Institute for VLBI ERIC), and NOVA (Netherlands Research School for Astronomy) are partners based in the Netherlands.

A starry sky made of more than 25,000 supermassive black holes

An international team of astronomers has produced the largest and sharpest map of the sky at ultra-low radio frequencies, using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio telescope. The map published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics reveals more than 25,000 active supermassive black holes in distant galaxies.

People of ASTRON: Paula Fusiara
SKAO is born - Launch of international Observatory signals new era for radio astronomy
People of ASTRON: Henk Vonk
People of ASTRON: Pieter Benthem
ASTRON reveals life cycle of supermassive black hole
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DAILY IMAGE
Colloquium: How to publish (and write) an impactful paper in Nature Astronomy

© Image credit: Marios Karouzos

In a rapidly inflating scientific literature, making your paper stand above the noise is more important and trickier than ever. To do so, you need good science, good writing and a high-quality journal to help you achieve the widest possible dissemination of your work.

Nature Astronomy, launched in January 2017, is a research journal published by Springer Nature. Sitting alongside our sister journal Nature, we publish high impact research in the fields of astronomy, astrophysics and planetary science.

In this talk, I will cover the motivation and scope of the journal, and the types of manuscripts we publish. I will demystify the editorial process and what we look for in papers (and shoot down some urban myths about what it takes to be published in a Nature journal in the process).

I will also cover common pitfalls of writing and submitting papers and I will share hints and tips on how to maximize the impact of your paper, from writing an engaging but informative title and a properly contextualized but concise abstract, to structuring your paper in a way that your results are communicated clearly and succinctly.

EVENTS

Applied RF technology course

Mon 17 May 2021 - Thu 20 May 2021

The RF course is an excellent introduction for Digital / Analog engineers who are or will be involved in the development of RF systems.

CAREERS

Latest tweets

Exciting new results from @LOFAR on famous fast radio burst FRB20180916B, recording bursts at ultra-low frequencies and providing new insights on bursts at these low frequencies! ✨🤓 http://bit.ly/3tje6ir

Exciting new results from #LOFAR on famous fast radio burst FRB20180916B, recording bursts at ultra-low frequencies and providing new insights on bursts at these low frequencies! ✨🤓 http://bit.ly/3tje6ir

Proud to have worked with an international team of astronomers to create the most sensitive images of the Universe ever taken at low radio frequencies✨. The use of #LOFAR reveals images of Milky Way like galaxies in the most distant parts of the Universe https://bit.ly/3cRUWKE

Proud to have worked with an international team of astronomers to create the most sensitive images of the Universe ever taken at low radio frequencies✨. The use of @LOFAR reveals images of Milky Way like galaxies in the most distant parts of the Universe https://bit.ly/3cRUWKE

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