ASTRON reveals life cycle of supermassive black hole

For the first time LOFAR and WSRT-Apertif have been used together to measure the life cycle of supermassive black holes emitting radio waves.

Cosmic flashes come in all different sizes

On May 24, four European telescopes took part in the global effort to understand mysterious cosmic flashes. The telescopes captured flashes of radio waves from an extreme, magnetised star in our galaxy.

Data release from the first year of the Apertif imaging surveys

The Apertif imaging team has released science data from the first year of science operations of WSRT-Apertif as the Apertif Data Release 1 (DR1). Now the entire astronomical community can access the data collected by Apertif in its first year of observing, which started on 1 July 2019.

First direct detection of a brown dwarf with a radio telescope

Astronomers at ASTRON  have discovered a brown dwarf with LOFAR. The discovery of the object dubbed Elegast, opens up a new path that uses radio telescopes to discover faint objects that are close-cousins of Jupiter-like exoplanets.

First phase of DISTURB completed

S[&]T (Science [&] Technology), ASTRON (Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy) and KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute) have completed the design of DISTURB, a warning system for eruptions on the sun.

Apertif images yield first scientific results

The Apertif upgrade of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) has yielded its first scientific paper based on its images. The paper has been published in the scientific journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

Simultaneous optical and radio observations of Perseids

From today (August 11th) up until Friday the yearly Perseids meteor shower will have its peak. This phenomenon is not only interesting for amateur astronomers, professional astronomers will be observing them as well.

What we look forward to in LOFAR 2.0: Live warning system to study solar eruptions

The Sun’s activity appears not only in the well-known 11-year Sunspot cycle, but also in short duration eruptions as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs).

What we look forward to in LOFAR 2.0: Habitability of alien worlds

The Earth receives its life-sustaining energy from Sunlight, but “explosions” on the Sun can also be life-threatening. Explosions on the Sun’s surface, called flares, can spew out large masses of plasma and harmful radiation towards the planets.

What we look forward to in LOFAR 2.0: Cranking up LOFAR’s robustness

In order to receive radio signals from across the Universe, LOFAR needs to be very sensitive. The downside of that sensitivity is susceptibility to radio interference: other sources that produce radio signals that LOFAR detects, but does not want to measure.

What we look forward to in LOFAR 2.0: LOFAR expands to Italy

In 2018, Italy officially joined the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) and in the near future the LOFAR station in Italy will become operational.

Nearest fast radio burst source is regularly active

An international team of astronomers, including a number of Dutch researchers, has discovered that a repeating fast radio burst (FRB) source becomes active about every sixteen days.

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Latest tweets

The first combined measurement with #LOFAR and #WSRT #Apertif has revealed the life cycle of a supermassive black hole. ⚫
https://bit.ly/2K5xuhu

The first combined measurement with @LOFAR and #WSRT #Apertif has revealed the life cycle of a supermassive black hole. ⚫
https://bit.ly/2K5xuhu

Daily image of the week: Installing smart e-meter with @Enexis to test if the GSM signals don't interfere with the telescope. First measurements look promising.
https://bit.ly/38x1AE4

Daily image of the week: Installing smart e-meter with @Enexis to test if the GSM signals don't interfere with the telescope. First measurements look promising.
https://bit.ly/38x1AE4

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