10 years of LOFAR highlights: Infographic - The evolution of LOFAR supercomputers

This infographic shows the 'evolution' of supercomputers used for LOFAR.

 

 

On 12 June 2020, LOFAR celebrates its tenth anniversary. The radio telescope is the world’s largest low frequency instrument and is one of the pathfinders of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which is currently being developed. Throughout its ten years of operation, LOFAR has made some amazing discoveries. It has been a key part of groundbreaking research, both in astronomy and engineering. Here we feature some – but definitely not all – of these past highlights, with surely more to come in the future.

Published by the editorial team, 5 June 2020

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