What we look forward to in LOFAR 2.0: Detecting SMBH particles

Supermassive black holes can leave a trail of energetic particles that astronomers are able to detect using radio telescopes.

What we look forward to in LOFAR 2.0: A brain transplant for LOFAR

If the antennae of LOFAR are the senses of the radio telescope, then the central correlator is its brain. It is the place where all the data streams come together and are converted into astronomy data.

What we look forward to in LOFAR 2.0: Simultaneous LBA and HBA observing

LOFAR uses two types of antennas. Each type listens to different wavelengths of the radio spectrum. Different wavelengths provide complementary information about the Universe and its constituents.

What we look forward to in LOFAR 2.0: Searching for extreme pulsars

During the 10 years since the LOFAR opening, the telescope has proven itself as an excellent instrument for the study of radio pulsars, rotating neutron stars whose radio beams act as lighthouses.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: The use of GPS receivers and rubidium modules to sync the stations

One of the important aspects of radio telescopes, in general, is the synchronisation in between antennas and for LOFAR in particular the synchronization between stations

Happy birthday to LOFAR!

Today LOFAR celebrates its tenth anniversary.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: A LOFAR View of the Turbulent Ionosphere

The view of the radio universe at the VHF frequencies of LOFAR is strongly affected by the Earth’s ionosphere.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Infographic - Off the shelf GPU's

This infographic explains how LOFAR utilizes off the shelf GPU's to create a detailed image from data streams of radio waves.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: A large light-mass component of cosmic rays at 1017-1017.5 eV from radio observations

LOFAR is a highly flexible instrument, which can be utilized for many things. Each antenna, for example, has a 5-second buffer, which can be used to measure very short, strong signals.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: A complete image of the visible sky every second

The behaviour of black holes and neutron stars can expose some of the most extreme tests of physical law. Therefore, this behaviour can be used to find answers to questions as to how black holes are born and to the origin of magnetic fields and cosmic rays.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: The LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey

A detailed radio image of the entire northern sky in the frequency range of 120-168 MHz. That is what the LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTTS) aims to achieve.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Improved upper limits on the 21 cm signal power spectrum of neutral hydrogen at z ≈ 9.1 from LOFAR

13.8 billion years ago, our Universe was created in an event called the Big Bang. "Only" 0.5 billion years later, the Universe entered a pivotal stage.

Latest tweets

Congratulations @SKA_telescope with their new brand✨! We are proud that the Netherlands' investment in the largest radio telescope in the world will generate unique knowledge, employment, activity for our industry and innovation @minocw @ivanengelshoven https://bit.ly/3nQhf7A

Elk jaar op 4 mei herdenken we de slachtoffers die voor onze vrijheid gevochten hebben. In bijgaand filmpje dat vorig jaar gemaakt werd kun je zien hoe onze Westerbork telescopen, net als vandaag, in de jaarlijkse rouwstand gaan: https://youtu.be/hIfDWorkwpU #4mei #Dodenherdenking

We congratulate our colleague Jason Hessels, who also works at ASTRON with this fantastic achievement!🎉

Daily Image of the Week: EUCARA-2021 https://bit.ly/3aW233v

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