10 years of LOFAR highlights: Pulsar shows sudden mood swings

In 2013 an international research team – led by Dutch astronomers (SRON, NOVA and ASTRON) – discovers that pulsar PSR B0943+10 can both radically change the amounts of radio waves and X-ray waves it emits within seconds.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Super-slow pulsar challenges theory

In 2017 LOFAR detects the slowest spinning radio pulsar to date. The neutron star spins around once only every 23.5 seconds almost three times more slowly than the slowest spinning radio pulsar detected up to that point (8.5 seconds).

10 years of LOFAR highlights: The construction and use of our own broadband optical data transport system

In the Netherlands, the LOFAR telescope consists of approximately 40 antenna stations that are spread over the entire North of the Netherlands. The amount of LOFAR data that needs to be transferred from these stations is so large that it cannot be sent via the regular Internet.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Infographic - Interference detection and Dysco

This infographic explains how LOFAR treats data collected by its stations.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: RSP boards make sure beamforming is possible

LOFAR is the first radio telescope of its size, wherein tens of thousands of small antenna elements are used instead of a few big dishes, as was more common in radio astronomy. All these antennas generate enormous amounts of data 24/7.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Why lightning often strikes twice

Although the saying goes ‘lightning never strikes the same place twice’, in fact it often does. Why it does so however, has long remained a mystery, but in 2019 a team of scientists led by the University of Groningen (RUG) used LOFAR to shed light on this matter.

LOFAR images cosmic radio monsters

Pareidolia is a tendency that pushes humans to see shapes in clouds or faces in inanimate objects.

Help to find the location of newly discovered black holes in the LOFAR Radio Galaxy Zoo project

Scientists are asking for the public’s help to find the origin of hundreds of thousands of galaxies that have been discovered by the largest radio telescope ever built: LOFAR.

Latest tweets

Daily Image of the Week: New HBA tile prototype for LOFAR4SW works, the new tile will be capable of producing two beams, to allow parallel astronomy and space weather observations. https://bit.ly/2XbDz2J

Daily Image of the Week: Apertif and @LOFAR uncover a Fast Radio Burst: Last week’s @Nature publishes the paper “Chromatic periodic activity down to 120 MHz in a Fast Radio Burst”. Apertif (left) and LOFAR (right) play leading roles for this result. https://bit.ly/38k2rXW

A fantastic video by @drbecky_ with a great explanation about @LOFAR and the recent press release of @AstroRadioLeah and her team!

Amazing result for @LOFAR and Westerbork radio telescopes! Astronomers combined both telescopes and discovered that a simple binary wind cannot cause the puzzling periodicity of an FRB. The bursts may come from a magnetar, results published in @Nature https://bit.ly/3sF7Cek

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