10 years of LOFAR highlights: A large light-mass component of cosmic rays at 1017-1017.5 eV from radio observations

LOFAR is a highly flexible instrument, which can be utilized for many things. Each antenna, for example, has a 5-second buffer, which can be used to measure very short, strong signals.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: A complete image of the visible sky every second

The behaviour of black holes and neutron stars can expose some of the most extreme tests of physical law. Therefore, this behaviour can be used to find answers to questions as to how black holes are born and to the origin of magnetic fields and cosmic rays.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: The LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey

A detailed radio image of the entire northern sky in the frequency range of 120-168 MHz. That is what the LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTTS) aims to achieve.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Improved upper limits on the 21 cm signal power spectrum of neutral hydrogen at z ≈ 9.1 from LOFAR

13.8 billion years ago, our Universe was created in an event called the Big Bang. "Only" 0.5 billion years later, the Universe entered a pivotal stage.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Using the existing SurfNet infrastructure to connect international stations and its European counterparts

In addition to the 40 Dutch antenna stations, LOFAR has 14 antenna stations elsewhere in Europe. Just like the antenna stations in the Netherlands, the European stations also send their observation data via fibre optic connections to the central processor (CEP) of LOFAR at Groningen.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Gentle reenergization of electrons in merging galaxy clusters

Supermassive black holes can leave a trail of energetic particles that astronomers are able to detect using radio telescopes. Usually the radio emissions from these particles fade away and become invisible.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Infographic - The evolution of LOFAR supercomputers

This infographic shows the 'evolution' of supercomputers used for LOFAR.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: The LOFAR Transient Buffer Board

The LOFAR Transient Buffer Board (TBB) gave the LOFAR radio telescope a unique extra capability: looking back in time.

10 years of LOFAR highlights:The use of a monitor & control system that monitors a physically widely distributed instrument

The day-to-day LOFAR operations require highly specialized monitoring and control systems. We use a system that easily enables us to visualize any values we put in our database in a graphic interface or time-sequenced graphs.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: LOFAR pioneers new way to study exoplanet environments

With the help of LOFAR, astronomers have been able to indicate the presence of a planet around a red dwarf star and with that, prove a theory that was composed with observations of Jupiter and its moon Io.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: The TBB boards that act as a time machine

The LOFAR Transient Buffer Board (TBB) gave the LOFAR radio telescope a unique extra capability: looking back in time.

10 years of LOFAR highlights: Revisiting the Fanaroff-Riley dichotomy and radio-galaxy morphology with the LOFAR Two-Metre Sky Survey

It has been known since the 1970s that the radio structures made by jets from black holes come in two types: very powerful jets are brightest at the edges and weaker jets are brightest in the middle and fade out at large distances.

Latest tweets

Daily Image of the Week: New HBA tile prototype for LOFAR4SW works, the new tile will be capable of producing two beams, to allow parallel astronomy and space weather observations. https://bit.ly/2XbDz2J

Daily Image of the Week: Apertif and @LOFAR uncover a Fast Radio Burst: Last week’s @Nature publishes the paper “Chromatic periodic activity down to 120 MHz in a Fast Radio Burst”. Apertif (left) and LOFAR (right) play leading roles for this result. https://bit.ly/38k2rXW

A fantastic video by @drbecky_ with a great explanation about @LOFAR and the recent press release of @AstroRadioLeah and her team!

Amazing result for @LOFAR and Westerbork radio telescopes! Astronomers combined both telescopes and discovered that a simple binary wind cannot cause the puzzling periodicity of an FRB. The bursts may come from a magnetar, results published in @Nature https://bit.ly/3sF7Cek

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