On Thursday 10 September, ASTRON welcomes Anne, Esther, Iris, Jessica, Malou, Mirthe and Sophie, from Assen. The girls, also known as the Spacegirls, have won the Dutch space competition for high school students, called the 'CanSat'. ASTRON sponsored the seven girls of the Dr. Nassau college, who were the only all girls team in the competition. This Thursday they will present their project at ASTRON.

Published by the editorial team, 9 September 2009

In this competition, organised by the Technical University Delft and space agency ISIS (Innovative Solutions In Space), teams from high schools from all over the Netherlands had to make satellites out of a soda can. This satellite, or ‘CanSat', had to perform two missions: the CanSat had to determine its height during its flight ánd it had to land safely. For the second mission, the Spacegirls chose to make a parachute for the CanSat.

On 3 July, the last day of the competition, the winners were announced in Delft. The spacegirls were very surprised with the outcome, but the jury was convinced: they worked very carefully and precisely on their CanSat and they had thought of a very special second mission. On 10 September, ASTRON will give celebrate this special project with a party for the girls.

See also: http://spacegirls.webs.com/.

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